Integral Theory

When there is a desire to change the management of emotions, behavior, skills or health, we are faced with an overwhelming barrage of options regarding how to accomplish this change.  As we are faced with this barrage, we often respond by trying to define the problem or circumstance keeping us from our intention by finding a name, diagnosis or group of others with the same block to our particular intention.  Once we have done this, we usually hope there will be a definitive therapy, pill or training that will resolve or at least lessen it’s influence on our intention.

At Innercept, we have pursued staff with many different life experiences, education and training.  The residents who have come here also have a similar wide range of diagnosis, prior education, treatment environments and functional levels. They arrive with just as diverse family supports.  We have made a concerted effort to resist the creation of a “mono culture” of clinicians, staff or resident population.  Instead, we believe that the diversity of diagnosis and clinical approach makes us a more healing environment.  We have avoided being seen as primarily medical model, behavioral, experiential, mentor or any one-school of thought.

The Innercept Program is based on a holistic model of functioning and development, drawing from Integral Psychology which was developed by Ken Wilber.  It is applied within the framework of the Integrative Mental Health Model defined by Andrew Weil, M.D.  We have also greatly benefited from the work of Roger Walsh, M.D. who has done an extensive review of the attributes of Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes.  We are blessed with impressive clinical resources both within Innercept and within our community for an approach that can be as intensive a clinical approach as needed for diagnosis and treatment.  We focus on a functional diagnostic approach to treatment versus a pure symptoms-based classification diagnostic approach.

Our simple mantra to residents is that whatever you are hoping to do after Innercept, you need to find a way to practice that level of functioning.  In other words, “show us don’t tell us”.  Development of a life practice that takes into account the individual and varied dimensions of the whole person will produce the best chance of a successful transition into productive adulthood.

Quadrant-based map of the focused integral assessment. The four core areas of the map are the individual’s interior self, the individual’s exterior self, the exterior environment/social world, and the interior values and culture of groups or society.

How is this theory applied?

Individualized approaches

At Innercept we take a comprehensive look at the resident’s life practice from each of the perspectives or quadrants described by Integral Theory. We focus on the internal self (feelings, self esteem, needs, spirituality and values) and external functioning (health, behavior and academics). We assist the resident in functioning optimally in their family, peer relationships and community, as well as help them develop healthy living habits.

The following are values that we use to refine inner character:

Physical

Physical

hygiene, diet, exercise, sleep habits, medication if needed

Behavioral

Behavioral

personal safety, physical/verbal control, attitude/manners

Self Image

Self Image

developing a positive and realistic view of oneself in the world and what one has to offer to others

Emotions

Emotions

mood regulation, stress response, tolerance, adaptability

Coping Skills

Coping Skills

responding to stress in a healthy manner, soothing oneself when upset, flexibility

Needs & Goals

Needs & Goals

understanding the needs, emotions and impulses which can motivate actions

Values

Values

clarifying the qualities that give life meaning and setting purposeful goals

Spiritual

Spiritual

understanding oneself in relationship to God/higher power/self/spirit

Responsibility

Responsibility

moral, physical, legal & mental accountability; care for one’s environment

Interpersonal Relations

Interpersonal Relations

developing effective social skills with others

Family Relationships

Family Relationships

improving or healing relationships to significant family members

Community

Community

Community involvement and community service

Support Groups

Support Groups

Finding and establishing support groups with whom one shares values and meaning

Unique approaches for everyone

Developmental Perspective

We take a developmental perspective with each resident in order to determine in what areas they are functioning at an age-appropriate level and in what areas they may be more immature. Many of our residents come with deficits in one or more area which has made it difficult for them to function in a typical home or school environment. At the same time, they excel in another areas. Residents are taught how to move into a more sophisticated level of functioning.

An individualized treatment plan is developed for each resident covering the above areas. Parents, staff and the resident complete assessment interviews which are incorporated into the overall plan. The resident is assisted in recognizing areas where they are already successful and are demonstrating age appropriate development. They are helped to determine areas of need where their functioning is less developed and in need of growth. A plan is established with specific step-wise goals to help the resident learn and practice the skills that are needed to catch-up when they are behind.

The resident participates in group and individual therapy designed to educate them regarding healthy functioning and resolution of issues which may have interfered with their development. Activities and daily life in the milieu allow the resident to practice the skills they are learning. Each resident has an individual therapist who is responsible for coordinating their treatment plan and maintaining communication with the family. Family therapy (phone and face to face) allows the resident to improve communication with the family. The resident is assisted in recognizing their own unique potential and to understand their personality type, emphasizing the positive and healthy aspects of their style. Many residents come to Innercept having difficulty managing the emotional states of anger, depression and anxiety. Through group therapy they assisted with being able to mange difficult emotions and influence their own internal states effectively. Groups and activities focusing on teaching anger management, relaxation and meditation are offered.

At Innercept we believe that the residents do not only need help in changing their behavior, but also need support in identifying the internal values which will help guide them through life. We maintain a respect for the diversity of the cultural, philosophical and spiritual values of each resident’s experience. We strive to help them identify, explore and internalize the values that they choose for themselves. We help each resident develop an understanding of the values that we share and help instill responsibilities of safety and respect for our physical well-being, responsible actions, cooperation with and acceptance of others, personal autonomy and working up to one’s potential as they build a life practice tailor made for them.

Program Values

  • Maintain a physically and emotionally safe environment
  • Create order out of chaos, inside and outside
  • Work hard; work together
  • Acknowledge that everyone has something to contribute; everyone has the right to be heard
  • Encourage positive communication and feedback among staff, residents, families, and neighbors
  • Encourage others to explore their dreams and actualize their potential